Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

libra scalesToday we are balanced at the very center of October, with fifteen days before us and fifteen days behind. (What a perfectly Libra thing to say!) That means you still have more than two weeks to prepare for NaNoWriMo – National Novel Writing Month (also known as November).

Lexington has almost 3,000 writers signed up to participate so far. Check out the Lexington page on the NaNoWriMo site to find out about meetings, parties, and write-ins scheduled throughout the month: https://nanowrimo.org/regions/usa-kentucky-lexington. (If you’re not from Lexington, click on the Regions link at the NaNoWriMo site to find your own local WriMo tribe.)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Small-Blue-RGB-National-Poetry-Month-LogoHave you ever wondered why April is National Poetry Month in the U.S. (and other places as well)? Perhaps because both Geoffrey Chaucer and T.S. Eliot open epic poems with references to the month: “Whan that Aprille with his shoores soote” (Canterbury Tales) and “April is the cruellest month” (The Waste Land). Or perhaps because many English-speaking children learn this simplest of rhymes almost as soon as they can speak: “April showers bring May flowers.”

April is also National Poetry Writing Month, or NaPoWriMo. If you want some writing inspiration, any number of sites offer daily prompts:

(These work just as well for other types of writing, if poetry isn’t your thing.)

Whatever writing you do this month, take time to appreciate the poetry that already surrounds you in song lyrics, in mnemonic devices (30 days hath September…), in the everyday speech of your community.

Happy Poetry Month!

Read Full Post »

Are you ready?

Think you might try your hand at poetry this year during National/Global Poetry Writing Month? You only have three more days to wait/prepare!

If you are looking for ideas, NaPoWriMo.net has great suggestions and resources, including links to over 300 (so far) participating blogs and websites.

Most April prompts don’t get posted until March 31, but if you want a bit more of a head start, these might fit the bill:

Sharpen your pencils and charge up your laptops — it’s going to be a creative month!

Read Full Post »

Happy Short Story Day!

In honor of the shortest period of daylight in the year, the northern hemisphere celebrates today as Short Story Day. (The southern hemisphere celebrates it on 21 June.) I was woefully uninformed about this holiday until the good folks at Writers Write, a wonderful, South African-based resource for writers, posted about it on their blog. They included links to other posts about the short story, and I’ve highlighted some below that I thought might be of particular interest.

The Long and the Short of It touches on some crucial differences between novels and short stories. This observation resonates with me most: “Rather than length as a dividing line, short stories – the good ones anyway – have a stronger sense of unity than a novel.” Novels can afford to meander; short stories have to make every word count.

Cut to the Chase offers great tips for beginning a short story. My favorite: “Read over your opening page and cross out every single line that is not indispensable. When you get to the line that simply cannot be left out, you’re at the start of the story.” This is a great editing tip for fiction of any length.

20 Unforgettable Quotes is just that – a list of clever, pointed, wry, and even soulful quotes about the short story. My favorite is from Stephen Colbert (#15).

It seems fitting to end with words of wisdom from the king – Stephen King. My favorite bit from Stephen King on Writing Short Stories is, “You need to take out the stuff that’s just sitting there and doing nothing.” Words to live by, my writing friends.

Short stories are my favorite prose form, so I intend to spend the day binge-reading Neil Gaiman and Ursula Le Guin. Happy Short Story Day!

 

Read Full Post »

Doris Settles and co-author Dixie Hibbs (the first woman inducted into the Bourbon Hall of Fame) have written Prohibition in Bardstown, KY: Bourbon, Bootlegging and Saloons which came out May 2 from History Press. First-person stories collected a quarter-century ago, legend, recipes and more abound in this fun, provocative book. Learn both the intended results and the unintended consequences of the temperance movement, which had been around since the birth of this country. This is the story of America’s only native spirit: Bourbon–and it’s afficianados, as well as its detractors from the ancient days of distilling in Babylon to the current Bourbon Craft resurgence we are experiencing today.

Doris and Dixie have copies to sell, and books are available from Amazon, Joseph-Beth, Morris, and local gift shops!

Read Full Post »

Whether your summer is busy or relaxed, chances are it brings a shift in activities and schedule. Why not incorporate something to stimulate your writing life?

Poet Jeannine Hall Gailey offers a short list of easy (and fun) ideas for shaking the cobwebs out of your brain this summer: “Five Things You Can Do to Up Your Writer’s Game Over the Summer.”

I’ve already started on number five, making a summer reading list. Hey, if the kids are going to sit around reading, I might as well do the same. Do yourself a favor and make a new habit (one that feeds your writing habit) this summer.

Read Full Post »

Writing is often described as a solitary activity, which is both true and misleading. Many aspects of the work of writing are best done (for most of us) in solitude, though there are exceptions to every rule. But even the most reclusive of writers needs other people to do her work: editors, agents, publicists, dog walkers, baristas, family members, printers, postal carriers, etc.

Today’s post at Positive Writer highlights some of the most essential members of a writer’s team: Four People You Positively Need in Your Writing Life. It’s a quick read, but if you can’t come up with a name for each category, you owe it to yourself to spend a little time thinking about who you might recruit. Because good writing is most definitely not a solitary activity.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »